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S3: Driving Desirable Change

How do we achieve ‘The ocean we need for the future we want’?

Summary

Seafood plays an important role in food systems as a source of protein and micronutrients, particularly for Small Island Developing States and coastal Indigenous Peoples. Production of food from the sea has the potential to increase substantially through improved management of wild harvesting and increased mariculture. Seafood production, distribution and consumption is changing rapidly with evolving consumer demand, nutritional and product awareness and production technology. A thorough evaluation of the needs, potential impacts and solutions that align seafood production and consumption with the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is required. This paper uses a descriptive narrative approach to examine the anticipated global trends for seafood over the next ten years to identify key pathways that could shift the current trajectory to a more sustainable 2030. Key ‘drivers’ influencing the global seafood system are identified and used to construct a future scenario based on our current trajectory (Business-as-usual 2030). This scenario is described through evidence-based fictional perspectives demonstrating how the anticipated future might be experienced by people in different social, geographical and economic situations. Descriptive pathways and actions are then presented for a more sustainable future that strives towards achieving the SDGs as far as technically possible (More sustainable 2030). The key actions underpinning the pathways to a more sustainable 2030 will have different, often competing, drivers and will be appropriate for implementation at different scales by different actors. Prioritising actions that not only sustainably produce more seafood, but consider aspects of access and utilisation for all is essential.

Infographic

Lead Investigators

Kristy de Salas

Kristy de Salas

University of Tasmania, Discipline of ICT

Kimberley Norris

Anchor

Jenn Scott

Jenn Scott

School of Psychology, University of Tasmania

Co-Authors

Meet our fellow team members who contribute to the success of this project.

Anna Farmery

Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security, University of Wollongong / CMS

Linda Murray

Massey University

Asta Audzijonyte

Carla Sbrocchi

Carla Sbrocchi

Emily Ogier

Ingrid van Putten

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere / CMS

Lindsay Wells

University of Tasmania, Discipline of ICT / UNSW - EPICentre
Lyn Goldsworthy

Lyn Goldsworthy

Mary Mackay

Mary Mackay

CSIRO Oceans & Atmosphere / CMS

Sierra Ison

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / CMS

Jeff McGee

Gretta Pecl

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / CMS
Coco Cullen-Knox

Coco Cullen-Knox

Silvana Bettiol

University of Tasmania, Medical Science
Janet Nye

Janet Nye

future seas

FUTURE SEAS is a unique collaboration , spear-headed by the Centre for Marine Socioecology, of over 100 researchers from the University of Tasmania (UTAS), the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and other institutions
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