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Cleaner Seas

5. Cleaner Seas

Reducing marine polution

Summary

Cleaner Seas: reducing marine pollution focuses on three sources of marine pollution. 1) municipal; such as plastic waste and wastewater, 2) agriculture; such as nutrient and sediment runoff, and 3) pollution from ships; such as fishing gear, sound and oil. Our paper will specifically focus on the state pollutants above and describe two future scenarios in the context of a river exiting into an urbanised bay. A river was selected as a large proportion of pollution is transported from land to the marine environment via a river. A bay enables us to include pollution from ships into the same visual scene. We provide a table of four actions in which marine pollution can be reduced (Prevent, Replace, Recover and Remove) and list case examples for each type of pollutant/source of pollutant and link each example to the relevant SDG. For all examples we rank them in order of priority with the highest priority being those which are highly effective at reducing marine pollution and highly feasible to implement from a legislative and economic perspective. For example, a Prevent action for plastic pollution is banning the production of certain plastic products such as microbeads. This action is a high priority because it is highly effective at reducing microbead pollution and highly feasible to implement from a legislative and economic perspective. The action links to SDG 14.1.

Infographic

Lead Investigators

Kathryn Willis

University of Tasmania, School of Social Sciences / CSIRO / CMS

Peter Puskic

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies

Anchor

Denise Hardesty

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere

Co-Authors

Meet our fellow team members who contribute to the success of this project.

Barbara Nowak

Catarina Serra Gonçalves

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies

Catriona MacLeod

Chris Wilcox

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere

Jayson Semmens

Joanna Vince

Politics and International Relations, School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania

Kelli Anderson

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / University of Tasmania
Kelsey Richardson

Kelsey Richardson

University of Tasmania, School of Social Sciences / CSIRO / CMS

Qamar Schuyler

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere

future seas

FUTURE SEAS is a unique collaboration , spear-headed by the Centre for Marine Socioecology, of over 100 researchers from the University of Tasmania (UTAS), the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and other institutions
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