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Cleaner Seas

5. Cleaner Seas

Reducing marine polution

Summary

In the age of the Anthropocene, the ocean has typically been viewed as a sink for pollution. Pollution is varied, ranging from human-made plastics and pharmaceutical compounds, to human-altered abiotic factors, such as sediment and nutrient runoff. As global population, wealth and resource consumption continue to grow, so too does the amount of potential pollution produced. This presents us with a grand challenge which requires interdisciplinary knowledge to solve. There is sufficient data on the human health, social, economic, and environmental risks of marine pollution, resulting in increased awareness and motivation to address this global challenge, however a significant lag exists when implementing strategies to address this issue. This review draws upon the expertise of 17 experts from the fields of social sciences, marine science, visual arts, and Traditional and First Nations Knowledge Holders to present two futures; the Business-As-Usual, based on current trends and observations of growing marine pollution, and a More Sustainable Future, which imagines what our ocean could look like if we implemented current knowledge and technologies. We identify priority actions that governments, industry and consumers can implement at pollution sources, vectors and sinks, over the next decade to reduce marine pollution and steer us towards the More Sustainable Future.

Infographic

Lead Investigators

Kathryn Willis

University of Tasmania, School of Social Sciences / CSIRO / CMS

Peter Puskic

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / CMS

Anchor

Denise Hardesty

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere

Co-Authors

Meet our fellow team members who contribute to the success of this project.

Barbara Nowak

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / CMS

Catarina Serra Gonçalves

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / CMS

Catriona MacLeod

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / CMS

Chris Wilcox

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere

Jayson Semmens

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania

Joanna Vince

School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania / CMS

Kelli Anderson

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
Kelsey Richardson

Kelsey Richardson

University of Tasmania, School of Social Sciences / CSIRO / CMS

Qamar Schuyler

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere
Per Ole Frederiksen

Nuunoq (Per Ole Frederiksen)

The Pisuna Project, Attu, Greenland
Halfdan Pedersen

Halfdan Pedersen

Pikkoritta Consult, Aasiaat, Greenland
Jonny Stark

Jonny Stark

Australian Antarctic Division

Jennifer Lavers

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies / CMS
Dean Greeno

Dean Greeno

Riawunna Centre for Aboriginal Education / CMS, Australia

future seas

FUTURE SEAS is a unique collaboration , spear-headed by the Centre for Marine Socioecology, of over 100 researchers from the University of Tasmania (UTAS), the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and other institutions
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